Family Matters

We fight for real Oregonians through their toughest times

Child Custody Lawyers in Portland

Protecting Your Custody Rights to the Fullest Extent

As a parent or grandparent, or even as another family member or person interested in a child’s well-being, you may have the right to a meaningful relationship with that child. This may include physical custody as well as making decisions regarding the child’s care. Child custody matters are highly complex and often emotionally charged as well, making it important to involve a competent attorney who can protect your rights.

Levine Law Center represents clients across the greater Portland area in custody proceedings related to divorce, paternity, fathers’ rights, mothers’ rights, grandparents’ rights, and third-party custodial rights. If you are going through a divorce or are dealing with any other issue involving custody or visitation, our Portland child custody attorneys may be able to help.

Call our custody attorneys at (503) 433-8340 or contact us online today to find out how we can help protect your rights!

Types of Child Custody Matters We Handle

Child custody and parenting time (visitation) must be addressed if parents are divorcing or separating. It may also come up in paternity cases, or if a child’s parents are incapacitated or lose their lives. Our Portland custody lawyers stand ready to help in any such situation.

We handle all types of child custody matters, including:

  • Fathers' Rights & Mothers' Rights – Protecting fathers’ rights and mothers’ rights in paternity proceedings, divorce, and all other matters related to child custody and parenting time. While the courts typically try to grant fathers and mothers similar rights regarding custody, extenuating circumstances or instances of abuse may create the need for a sole custody arrangement. Such decisions will be made in the child’s best interests.
  • Grandparent Custody & Visitation – In some cases, such as the incarceration or incompetence of a child’s parents, grandparents may have the right to custody of their grandchild. Our attorneys can address grandparents’ custody rights when these apply.
  • Third-Party Custody – While less common than parental rights or grandparents’ rights, third-party custodial rights may apply in cases where there is an existing relationship that fulfills traditional parental duties or involves long-term visitation or involvement in a child’s life. While Oregon law typically favors parents in child custody proceedings, non-parents may seek custody or visitation rights if there is evidence of a sufficient relationship and need, and if it is in the child’s best interests.

Oregon Child Custody FAQ

What Kinds of Custody Are There in Oregon?

Oregon has two types of custody: joint custody and sole custody. Joint custody means that both parents share in the decision-making for their child. In joint custody cases, it isn't necessary for the child to spend 50% of their time with each parent–the percentage depends on what the parents or the court decide. In sole custody cases, only one parent has physical custody and decision-making authority for the child.

How Is Child Custody Determined in Oregon?

According to the Oregon State Bar website, Oregon courts make custody determinations based on the "best interests and welfare of the child." Judges take the following matters into account when deciding custody:

  • The child's emotional relationship with each parent
  • Each parent's interest in and attitude toward the child
  • Each parent's desire to continue a relationship with the child
  • Each parent's willingness and capacity to facilitate and encourage a relationship with the other parent and child
  • Each parent's income and home environment (only if it may cause emotional or physical harm to the child)
  • Any history of family violence or domestic abuse
  • Any history of alcohol or substance abuse
  • Who the primary caregiver of the child is

Is Oregon a Mother or Father State When It Comes to Custody?

According to Oregon custody laws, preference may not be shown to either the mother or the father in a custody case based on their gender. Rather, Oregon courts take into consideration the "preference of the primary caregiver of the child." Whoever was parent who took care of the child before the divorce has a stronger say in custody, as long as the court deems the primary caregiver to be "fit."

At What Age Can a Child in Oregon Decide Which Parent to Live With?

In Oregon custody cases, minor children do not have a say in which parent they may live with. Custody is determined between the parents, or by the court if custody is contested. Children in Oregon may only choose who they live with once they are emancipated/reach the age of majority, which is 18 years old.

Contact us at (503) 433-8340 to discuss your needs and how we can help.

Oregonians Love Us

See Why We're the Right Choice
  • Flexible Payment Options

    Everyone deserves quality, legal representation. We make it as easy as possible to get you access to a reputable and qualified attorney.

  • Team Oriented Approach

    When you work with us you're not just a number; we work as a team to ensure your success. 

  • Conveniently Located

    We are conveniently located off of I-205 for our clients in Multnomah and Clackamas Counties, and our attorneys will come out to meet clients that live in Washington and Yamhill Counties.

  • Not Your Typical Family Law Firm

    Our priority is your outcome. We take a personalized approach to ensuring your success.

The Levine Law Center Team

We're aggressive, approachable, and well-respected in our legal community.
  • Andrew  Levine Photo
    Andrew Levine

    Founding Attorney

    Andrew created the Levine Law Center to serve the needs of his community. He previously worked on behalf of insurance carriers and employers, but soon realized that regular, hard-working people were getting taken advantage of. Andrew wanted nothing to do with that, and switched sides. Ever since, Andrew has been a champion for the worker and the great people of his community. Andrew has a reputation for his aggressive and tenacious advocacy of his clients. Knowing that his clients and their ...
  • Anthony  Stuart Photo
    Anthony Stuart

    Attorney

    Anthony Stuart joined the Levine Law Center team in 2019 and is admitted to practice law in Oregon and Florida (presently inactive). He started his legal career in Florida and first started practicing family law alongside a complex business and family immigration law practice. After moving to Oregon in 2015, Anthony established a new law practice dedicated to working with small to medium-sized enterprises on regulatory matters, governmental affairs, mergers and acquisitions, and corporate ...
  • Joseph  Katz Photo
    Joseph Katz

    Attorney

    Joseph Katz joined the Levine Law Center team in 2020. In 2012, he began practicing medical malpractice law in New York but moved back to Oregon in 2014 while maintaining a civil litigation and business path. He approaches each client compassionately according to their own needs while zeroing in on clear goals and objectives. Joseph spent significant time in Israel and enjoys running (he ran the New York City Marathon in 2013) and biking the great outdoors with his wife and two young children.
  • Jennifer L. Peckham Photo
    Jennifer L. Peckham

    Attorney

    Jennifer is a highly experienced family law attorney, having handled hundreds of cases since becoming licensed in 2009. While divorce and custody cases are common in her practice, Jennifer has also handled relocations, child support and spousal support modifications, dissolutions of domestic partnerships and restraining order cases. Using her Master’s in Education on top of her legal training, Jennifer leverages her experience as an educator to help convey her clients’ narratives. Jennifer is a ...
/

Get In Touch

We're happy to answer your questions
  • Please enter your first name.
  • Please enter your last name.
  • Please enter your phone number.
    This isn't a valid phone number.
  • Please enter your email address.
    This isn't a valid email address.
  • Please make a selection.
  • Please enter a message.